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anne hudson

‘My blue vessels are slip cast porcelain. I pour porcelain slip, liquid clay into a mould and let it soak in irregularly. This is then trimmed and dried. Then bisque fired to 900 celsius. This ware is then painted expressively with copper oxide and glazed over this the glaze and copper combine to create the blues and greens. This is fired to 1170 to 1200 Celsius. I then freely paint a gold lustre on the glaze. The lustre is pure gold about 22 carat or more in a medium. The medium fires away leaving the gold on the glaze. The gold is fired to 700 Celsius. Each stage of the process involves attrition, successes and failures.
 
 Handthrown Ceramics

Handthrown Ceramics

 

We love.....

Each piece is unique - a characteristic that we are not unfamiliar with at Artform. BUT, with Anne, while she is in a phase of Ice Bowls, they vary so much - and each one will respond to each individual. Whether more gold, representing the sunlight on the icicles of the Antarctica, or less gold. Wild shown in the torn rim, or smooth like the snow after melting....and the best part is the outcome of her work surprises even her as the artist, such is the element of surprise in each work. ARTFORM

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Feature 

Anne learnt her craft as an expatriate of New Zealand while living in Dubai, going on to teach at the Dubai International Art Centre. On here return to New Zealand, Anne furthered her practice by studying towards a Diploma in Ceramics which developed her skill level while learning from many experienced potters. On another overseas adventure, this time to Sydney, Anne studied at the National Art School where she undertook a Masters in Fine Arts. This study confirmed for Anne that ceramics is a mode of expression worthy of a place in the art world and developed an interest in the value of the vessel as a metaphor or vehicle for meaning. Anne liked to consider the vessel and how it sits with linguistic concepts and philosophical theory, at the same time as enjoying the tacit enjoyment of working with clay.

One of Anne’s favourite references is from Rose Slivka who states that the object is the poet. Anne firmly believes that a good object can sing, speak or give rise to the narrative, ideas and concepts. The vessel is an abstract form in that it is a skin for nothing with a limitless potential to express meaning. Vessels are an integral part of our existence from the womb, breast, cup to coffin and as such need our respect and reverence.